I have learned in leading worship that competence as a musician will only get you so far. 

s worship leaders, we are constantly being pushed to have the best teams of people, sometimes at the expense at having the most holy. Don’t get me wrong, God calls us to be people who glorify Him even through our practice and proficiency, but even more integral to the mission on Sunday mornings is our holiness. Our people need our holiness. 

he days of the complacent worship leader are over. We have seen, heard, and for some of us experienced the damage done by “worship leaders” too eager to pursue fame at the expense of pursuing Christ. We no longer have the luxury of leading out of our competence. God calls us to be leaders first in private, in the secret matters, before preaching and leading from the stage. 

n a book about prayer E. M. Bounds talks about the power that a godly, holy person has when he leads. He says that the man that preaches out of his competence preaches death. But the crucified man – the man who has thrown his own life to the wind – that man preaches life when he understands he must kill and destroy his old self. He says that the most life changing moments for any preacher should occur in private communion with God. 

ounds is getting at the most important part of a believer’s life - his relationship with his Savior. Every worship leader needs to have a secret life with Jesus. A life that only he, and maybe his closest community, knows about. 
 
This might mean that you start creating and implementing spiritual disciplines in order to grow in your relationship with God. You do things that express and remind you of the mission God has called you to. You must engage with the word of God and experience inward change before you lead your churches through song. 

ur churches and our gatherings would look drastically different if more worship leaders learned how to first lead themselves, before they started to lead others. When we meet with the Lord privately, He will give us the favor and strength to lead our churches publicly on Sunday mornings.

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